We are all Ayotzinapa': the role of digital media in the shaping of transnational memories of disappearance

Collective memory has been a continuous object of study since the 1980s. We know a lot about how nations remember and also about the role of traditional media in the way certain events are recorded and broadcasted. However, the acceleration of globalization dramatically changed this scenario: digital media has widely affected the relationship between media and memory and has facilitated the transnationalization of memory. How does digital media affect the cultural concept of memory? Which are the traits that make this memory different from that of the broadcast era? To what extent has the traditional conception of national memory been changed in the global scenario? In order to answer these questions, the “Digital Memories” project, financed by a Starting Grant of the European Research Council, investigates the shaping of a memory currently taking place: the disappearance of 43 students from Ayotzinapa, Mexico, in September 2014.

Bringing together perspectives of memory studies, cultural studies, media studies, law, sociology, visual culture and history, “Digital Memories” aims at providing a theoretical model to analyze traumatic events that acquire a global dimension in digital environments.

TEAM

Silvana Mandolessi

Silvana Mandolessi

Principal Investigator

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Katia Olalde

Katia Olalde

Postdoctoral Researcher

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Fabiola Navarro

Fabiola Navarro

Postdoctoral researcher

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Lene Guercke

Lene Guercke

Doctoral researcher

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Martin Zicari

Martin Zicari

Doctoral researcher

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Main picture’s reference: Flickr